Centers explained

In another message from Shepherd Hoodwin in the group he explains how the Centers work. I’m glad he did that because the Centers are very key to how we interact with our environment and a practical explanation is very hard to find. The Center determines how one responds to external stimuli. Everybody has a primary Center and a Secondary center. The secondary Center is called the ‘part of’. For example , I’m in the Emotional Part (=secondary) of Intellectual Center (=primary). In the excerpt below the dynamics of the Intellectual Center (Emotional part) are very well explained and I immediately recognized the truth of it.

If you are intellectually centered, in the emotional part (secondary), it means that your first reaction is to analyze, and then you more-or-less automatically feel based on your thoughts once they are crystallized in reaction to something that occurred. To change your feelings, first change your thoughts. The positive pole of the intellectual center is thought, the negative, reason, which, in this context, means mechanical thinking that’s asleep, not seeing with fresh eyes and engaging in original thought. Those who are intellectually centered might be especially drawn to reading and analyzing. The weak link when your primary center is intellectual and your secondary is emotional are the two body centers—taking action and having physical experience, which is what will most balance you. If you fall into the trap of your center and worry—negative thoughts leading to negative feelings, leading to still more negative thoughts and still more negative emotions, forming a vicious circle—the way out is to do something. This is accomplished by distracting your emotional part: instead of worrying your thoughts to death, put on some music, look at some art, or anything else that will allow you to have emotions about something neutral, until you can gain control enough to take positive action.

The full explanation can be found here.

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